Monday , 19 April 2021
  • Youth called to engage in aquaculture to secure fish supply

    The African swine fever threatening the protein supplies of the country still grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the chief of an international research center to call for more youth to be involved in aquaculture. “Now, more than ever, is the time for our youth to engage in the efficient production of healthy protein through … …

  • Baliao: Revive abandoned hatcheries to boost local aquaculture

        ROXAS City – To boost the local aquaculture industry, SEAFDEC/AQD Chief Dan Baliao said abandoned and underutilized hatcheries in the province should be rehabilitated to produce much-needed crablets and fish fry. He said this during a dialogue with local fish farmers who aired that there were not enough suppliers of crablets that they … …

  • Heated tanks lead to productive milkfish spawning in cold months

    SEAFDEC/AQD is promoting a simple technology to address the perennial shortage of milkfish fry that continues to hound fish farmers in the Philippines during the colder months of the year. …

More News

A hard problem with a soft solution: Catfish farm’s production surges after easy fix

There are not enough catfish in the “Catfish Country” of Zarraga, Iloilo, but recent findings in one farm may just be the catalyst that could catapult the fish into abundance. Zarraga Pantat Fingerlings was one of the many farms struggling to keep pace with buyers’ demands while itself suffering from many catfish eggs that fail to hatch and catfish fry that die before they can be sold to other farmers that grow them in ponds.     Larry Pañoso, the hatchery operations in-charge, said that they achieved a breakthrough in January when  their production reached an all-time high of 500,000 fry per week after the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC/AQD) helped resolve a problem with their water …

Read More »

Priority Infrastructure Updates 2021

SEAFDEC/AQD is nearing the completion of two multi-species hatcheries and a milkfish broodstock facility at its research complex in Tigbauan, Iloilo. These priority infrastructure projects are being built to intensify demonstration and techno-transfer programs, as well as to help address the shortage of aquaculture seeds in the Philippines, the host country of the research center.

Read More »

Community-based sea ranching: fisherfolks’ legacy to sustainable fisheries

Just off Molocaboc Island, beneath a turquoise canopy of water, fishers search the coral reef to pick out abalone and sea cucumber, two prized delicacies in Asian cuisine. Live abalone sells abroad for up to $120 or approximately P5,700 a kilo, and dried sea cucumber, $2000 or about P96,000 a kilo. But the fishers are not here to cash in on the abalone grazing on coralline substrates and the sea cucumber burrowing in the white sand. Not yet. They carefully weigh and size them, log the numbers in a notebook, and return them to the reef to continue to grow and reproduce. During the formative years of the sea ranching project, the fisherfolks asked when they will benefit from the …

Read More »

Profiles in Science: Peter Palma and the Case of Serendipity

Being a scientist was never part of his career plan, but this young researcher is already making waves in aquaculture research with his award-winning study on the giant grouper, a “threatened” fish locally known as lapu-lapu. Peter Palma and his team recently bagged the prestigious Dr. Elvira O. Tan Awards – Outstanding Published Paper in the Aquatic Science Category for their paper that studied the sexual development of the hermaphrodite fish and debunked presumed norms on the origin of the male giant grouper. Their paper titled “Reproductive development of the threatened giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus,” published in the Aquaculture Journal last July 2019, presented evidence that male giant grouper do not need to pass through a female stage at an earlier …

Read More »

‘Spaghetti’ fed to shrimp in bid to cut aquaculture cost

Humans are not the only ones who enjoy eating spaghetti—shrimp can, too. Researchers are using nutritious green “spaghetti algae” in fish and shrimp feeds as part of a broader move to bring down the cost of expensive aquafeeds which account for over half the expenses of farmers. “The ultimate aim of using spaghetti algae, or any other alternative ingredient, in aquafeed is to bring down the feed cost in aquaculture,” said Joseph Biñas, associate researcher and feed mill supervisor at the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC/AQD) in Tigbauan, Iloilo. Biñas further said that, “The use of alternative ingredients, especially if these are locally available and sustainably produced, may considerably reduce the cost of formulated feeds.” Chaetomorpha linum, …

Read More »
Untitled Document
Translate »